Fables & Gables

254 notes

medievalpoc:

European School, Peru
Portrait of King Lloqui Yupanqui of the Inca
Spain; Peru (c. 1615)
Oil on Canvas, 60 x 55.2 cm.

Although indigenous people ranked below Spaniards in Spanish America’s social order, direct descendants of pre-Hispanic nobility were afforded certain political privileges, including the right to hold office in local government. In order to legitimize claims to noble lineage in the viceroyalty of Peru, members of the Inca elite often conspicuously displayed in their homes Europeanized portraits of their ancestors, the fourteen ancient Andean rulers.
Aunque los indígenas estaban por debajo de los españoles en el orden social de Hispanoamérica, a los descendientes directos de la nobleza prehispánica se les permitían ciertos privilegios políticos, incluyendo el derecho de tener cargos en el gobierno local. Para legitimar la atribución de linaje noble en el virreinato del Perú, miembros de la élite inca frecuentemente exhibían en sus casas retratos europeizados de sus ancestros, los catorce gobernantes andinos.

Brooklyn Museum

medievalpoc:

European School, Peru

Portrait of King Lloqui Yupanqui of the Inca

Spain; Peru (c. 1615)

Oil on Canvas, 60 x 55.2 cm.

Although indigenous people ranked below Spaniards in Spanish America’s social order, direct descendants of pre-Hispanic nobility were afforded certain political privileges, including the right to hold office in local government. In order to legitimize claims to noble lineage in the viceroyalty of Peru, members of the Inca elite often conspicuously displayed in their homes Europeanized portraits of their ancestors, the fourteen ancient Andean rulers.

Aunque los indígenas estaban por debajo de los españoles en el orden social de Hispanoamérica, a los descendientes directos de la nobleza prehispánica se les permitían ciertos privilegios políticos, incluyendo el derecho de tener cargos en el gobierno local. Para legitimar la atribución de linaje noble en el virreinato del Perú, miembros de la élite inca frecuentemente exhibían en sus casas retratos europeizados de sus ancestros, los catorce gobernantes andinos.

Brooklyn Museum

Filed under Spain Painting Art Portrait Oil Canvas

919 notes

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Mercy
Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600); Rundell Bridge & Rundell (jeweller)
Dated: early 17th century
Medium: steel, iron, copper, wood, the scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
Measurements: 96.5 x 19 cm
Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
Provenance: probably created for the coronation of Charles I in 1626
The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, and a broad steel blade, truncated about 2.5 cms from the original point, with a “running wolf” mark inlaid in copper. It is presented with its velvet-covered leather scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.
This sword, known as the Sword of Mercy or the Curtana, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by two swords of Justice (Sword of Temporal Justice and Sword of Spiritual Justice). 
The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189. This sword, representing Mercy, has had its tip removed so that it no longer functions as a weapon, although in origin it was constructed in the same way as a practical sword.
The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched.
It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Mercy

  • Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600); Rundell Bridge & Rundell (jeweller)
  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Medium: steel, iron, copper, wood, the scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
  • Measurements: 96.5 x 19 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
  • Provenance: probably created for the coronation of Charles I in 1626

The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, and a broad steel blade, truncated about 2.5 cms from the original point, with a “running wolf” mark inlaid in copper. It is presented with its velvet-covered leather scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.

This sword, known as the Sword of Mercy or the Curtana, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by two swords of Justice (Sword of Temporal Justice and Sword of Spiritual Justice).

The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189. This sword, representing Mercy, has had its tip removed so that it no longer functions as a weapon, although in origin it was constructed in the same way as a practical sword.

The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched.

It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Filed under Zandona Ferrara Sword Weaponry 17th Century England

109 notes

archaicwonder:

Villanovan Bronze Crested Helmet, c. 900 BC
The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders which was followed by the Etruscan civilization. Villanovan culture and people branched from the Urnfield culture of Central Europe. The name Villanovan comes from the first archaeological site where artifacts were discovered near Villanova, not far from Bologna in northern Italy.  They controlled the rich copper and iron mines of Tuscany and were accomplished metalworkers.

archaicwonder:

Villanovan Bronze Crested Helmet, c. 900 BC

The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders which was followed by the Etruscan civilization. Villanovan culture and people branched from the Urnfield culture of Central Europe. The name Villanovan comes from the first archaeological site where artifacts were discovered near Villanova, not far from Bologna in northern Italy.  They controlled the rich copper and iron mines of Tuscany and were accomplished metalworkers.

(Source: timelineauctions.com)

Filed under Helmet Armor 9th Century BCE 10th Century BCE Villanova Italy